Summer Learning Loss

by DrBrandonSantanMainSiteWPAdmin8879
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SUMMER LEARNING LOSS

13 ARGUMENTS FOR A YEAR ROUND SCHOOL CALENDAR

1. Lower standardized test scores. Love them or hate them, standardized testing is one way schools monitor progress. A longer summer break is associated with lower standardized test scores. Schools with year round calendars score an average of 10% higher on standardized tests. Schools that want a way to boost test scores should consider a year round school calendar.

2. Math skills loss. Math scores suffer the most with a long summer break. Math scores are already low when it comes to state and federal standards. A traditional summer break makes them worse.

3. Reading and spelling abilities suffer. Not quite as dramatic as math, largely due to summer reading programs, reading and spelling take a hit also with the traditional summer break.

4. Higher risk groups, such as low income families, single parent families and dual income families suffer biggest losses over a long summer break.

5. Summer learning loss becomes habit that can follow students throughout their educational pursuits - even in college.

6. Summer break is based on tradition rather than what most benefits the students.

7. Summer break is based on life demands that no longer exist (e.g., agriculture).

8. Summer learning loss contributes to delinquency and higher dropout rates, especially in high risk groups.

9. Lack of summer learning programs and lack of access to summer learning programs that are available contribute to learning loss.

10. Most summer learning programs are remedial.

11. Lower activity levels during summer contribute to lazy study habits and a disinterest in studies.

12. A lower activity level during summer break contributes to fatigue, brain fog, decreased memory recall, increase in weight gain and an increase in ADHD symptoms.

13. Teachers typically spend between 4-6 weeks at the beginning of the school year after summer break re-teaching material that students have forgotten over the summer.

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